TV

Netflix Made a Huge Mistake Scrapping This Rick Riordan Series


Following the success of Percy Jackson and the Olympians, Rick Riordan’s The Kane Chronicles deserves to find a home.

Rick Riordan and Walker Scobell behind the scenes of Percy Jackson and the Olympians
Photo: Disney

Percy Jackson and the Olympians has been doing phenomenal numbers for Disney+ with 110 million hours streamed as of Feb. 7, according to a press release. Fans of this beloved Rick Riordan book series have been waiting nearly two decades for a worthwhile adaptation, and thanks to Riordan’s involvement and an immense amount of care from the cast and crew, Disney+ seems to have struck gold with this franchise.

However, Percy Jackson and the Olympians isn’t the only mythology-based middle grade book series that Rick Riordan has written. The Kane Chronicles may not be as well-known as its Greek predecessor, but this 2010s trilogy based on Egyptian mythology still has a dedicated fan base eager to see these characters on screen. 

Following estranged siblings Carter and Sadie Kane, The Kane Chronicles is an epic story of magic, legend, and the power of family. After being taken in by their Uncle Amos and introduced to their family’s long history as magicians, Carter and Sadie discovery that not only are they hosts, or conduits, for the Egyptian gods Horus and Isis, but that other gods are coming back to life all over the world, and not all of them have good intentions. Using their newfound powers and connection to a secret society of magicians, Carter and Sadie have to put their past aside and work together to save their family, and the world.

Riordan first announced that a film series based on The Kane Chronicles was going into development for Netflix in 2020, but recently gave a disappointing update, telling a fan on GoodReads (via Variety) that “Right now, Kane Chronicles is in ‘turnaround,’ which means Netflix has decided not to move forward and their option has lapsed after trying for two years to develop a script they liked. Now it depends on whether another studio would like to step in, assume the preproduction costs, and move forward.”

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